The Dept. Of atomic Energy (DAE) estimates Rs 1,260 crore for the LIGO India project

Highlights:

  • The estimated funding requirement for ambitious LIGO India project of setting up interferometer to record gravitational waves in collaboration with the US-based detectors will see an upward revision - a figure the department of atomic energy is expected to compute in a month.
  • The Dept. Of atomic Energy (DAE) is expected to foot a revised figure of estimate for the project in a month, once it is cleared by the LIGO India Project Management Board.
  • It is chaired by director city-based Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT).
  • The union cabinet gave an in-principle nod of Rs 1,260 crore for the LIGO India project.
  •  It included funds for site acquisition, building of infrastructure, guiding systems, detector components and keeping it operational for next 10 years.
  • The initial estimate was arrived at in 2012.
  • It took time to hunt for the site - 4km by 4 km land area.
  • RRCAT scientists are involved in scouting land for the LIGO India project and developing and operationalizing critical components of the detector in collaboration with the US-based LIGO Science Collaboration.
  • The cost of the project will have to be revisited.
  • A new estimate is expected to be brought before the project management board for approval in one month.
  • Once it is approved, DAE is expected to take up the matter with the government.
  • The LIGO India project is the advanced gravitational-wave detector planned in India in collaboration with US-based LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) Science Collaboration. 
  • The detector in India will form a triangulate along with the two US-based instruments in recording gravitational waves with more accuracy.
  • Earlier, the detector was planned to be established in Australia - in the southern hemisphere for better triangulation.
  • But Australia could not garner funds, thus US consortium offered the same to India.
  • The LIGO India project is expected to be installed in 2012.
  • Once the site is finalized, the directorate of constructions services and estate management will start working on developing the infrastructure.
  • The detector components, many developed in RRCAT, will be simultaneously developed with the help of the US.
  • The actual science operations will start by 2025.
  • It takes a lot of time to tune the interferometer.
  • LIGO India Scientific Board is chaired by director of the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune.
  • Once the project becomes operational, it will work on the science with the detector - astronomy and astrophysics.
  • It will also oversee how to liaison with institutes and other academic works.
  • A rough estimate suggests that over 500 trained scientists are required to run the project.
  • The RRCAT is in the process of training them in collaboration with the projects.